Search Bloguru posts

The disruption of the Sho Chu Market

thread
By Yuji Matsumoto

While sake is renown as an alcoholic beverage unique to Japan, there is very little recognition of shochu among American consumers. Because there is little information on the difference between the Korean Soju and traditional Japanese shochu, consumers are confused. This is a unique case particular to California, but despite shochu being a distilled spirit, if imported with alcohol level below 24%, then restaurants with Beer & Wine licenses can sell them as “Soju” as long as they’re imported and registered accordingly. Because over 90% of Japanese restaurants in California only hold Beer & Wine licenses, the term “Soju” must be used over “Shochu.” Depending on the manufacturers, some register two different labels for the same brand: the term “Soju” is used for alcohol level of 24%, while alcohol level of 25% and above is referred to as “Shochu.” The root of all confusion is this law. While the vendor wants to sell as Shochu, the market becomes so limited by the naming that vendors are forced to sell them as “Soju” instead. Since the label reads “Soju,” there’s no point in trying to explain that “Japanese Shochu is different from Soju,” since most American consumers don’t read Japanese and won’t understand the difference. I’m also troubled about how to train my employees.

The root of all confusion is this law. While the vendor wants to sell as Shochu, the market becomes so limited by the naming that vendors are forced to sell them as “Soju” instead. Since the label reads “Soju,” there’s no point in trying to explain that “Japanese Shochu is different from Soju,” since most American consumers don’t read Japanese and won’t understand the difference. I’m also troubled about how to train my employees.

While the Japanese are well aware of the obvious difference between the Korean Soju and traditional Japanese shochu by the name, it’s still a notable problem that American consumers who hold the key to expansion into future markets don’t know this difference. Since it seems unlikely that this law will be revised anytime soon, the only option is to advocate the ingredients, processing methods and ways to enjoy shochu as Japanese Premium Soju. Also, for import and distribution companies, one suggestion would be to distinguish Shochu as Japanese Premium Soju, or to include the subtitle “Honkaku Soju.”


混乱する焼酎市場

日本固有の酒文化として日本酒(サケ)は大分知られるようになったが、まだまだ焼酎の知名度はアメリカ人にとって低い。また、韓国Sojuと日本の本格焼酎の違いについても情報提供がないため、消費者は困惑するばかりだ。カリフォルニア州での例外話しだが、日本の焼酎は蒸留酒にもかかわらず、アルコール度数が24度以下で「Soju」として輸入登録すればBeer & Wineライセンスのレストランでも売れる面白い法がある。9割以上のカリフォルニア州の日本食レストランは、Beer & Wineのライセンスしか保有していないので、ここで飲めるのは焼酎という名前ではなくSojuということになる。

メーカーによっては、同じ銘柄でも2種類のラベル登録(24度のものはSoju、25度のものはShochu)をしている会社もある。

全ての混乱を引き起こしている問題は、この法律にある。売り手は、Shochuとして売りたいが、市場が極端に狭まるためにSojuとして販売せざる終えない。ラベルにはSojuと書いてあるのに「日本の焼酎はSojuと違う」と言われても日本語を読めないアメリカ人消費者はわけが分からないのは当然のこと。私自身も従業員トレーニングをする際に非常に困るのだ。

原料や製法の違いはもちろんこと、日本の本格焼酎と韓国Sojuでは味わい方や飲み方が全く異なる。本格焼酎は、日本酒の性質(複雑な味わいと食事との相性)を兼ねつつ蒸留酒にあるアルコール感と割り(カクテル)ができるの特徴だ。性質の異なる商品が同じ名前として扱われるのはお互い(韓国も日本も)不都合である。

日本人にとってはその違いは文字で端的に韓国Sojuと日本の本格焼酎の区別が理解できるが、今後の市場の拡大を握っているアメリカ人消費者には分からないのが大きな課題だ。この法律規制は、当面解消されることがないので、とりあえずはJapanese Premium Sojuとしてその原料や製法、飲み方を提唱していくことしかないのである。また、輸入や販売会社においては、Japanese Premium Soju、もしくは、サブタイトルに「Honkaku Soju」と入れるといいかもしれない。
#alljapannews #soju #sake #shochu

People Who Wowed This Post

  • If you are a bloguru member, please login.
    Login
  • If you are not a bloguru member, you may request a free account here:
    Request Account