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“WHERE THINGS SO SMALL CAN HAVE A MASSIVE IMPACT ON YOUR HEALTH.”
Herbsprout is a webblog and podcast dedicated to sharing the health benefits of herbs, food, innovations related to our gut microbiome. Herbsprout seeks to bridge the vast chasm dividing the mainstream medical community, alternative medicine, and Asian medicine, especially of China (TCM), India (Ayurveda), and Japan (eJim & Kampo).

Gut bacteria connected to p53 gene suppresses, is resistant to tumors

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Gut bacteria connected to p53 ...
A July 29 2020 article published by Nature reported the connection of gut bacteria producing gallic acid and tumor resistance. The research was led by a team of scientists including Audrey Lasry Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, Ela Elyada of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, and Irit Snir-Alkalay, Avanthika Venkatachalam of Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel (1).

The p53 gene like the Rb gene, is a tumor suppressor gene, and is known to contribute to stopping the formation of tumors (2). Cancer is known to be facilitated by loss of p53. Researchers found that mutant p53 had the expected oncogenic effect (a gene mutation that can lead to the growth of cancer cells). However, in the proximal gut and in tumour organoids it had a pronounced tumour-suppressive effect (based on mice studies).

In the tumour-suppressive mode, mutant p53 eliminated dysplasia and tumorigenesis. Researchers found that gallic acid reverses mutant-p53-induced WNT suppression and promotes dysplasia and tumorigenesis across the entire gut (2). Lactobacillus plantarum and Bacillus subtilis—have been identified as producers of gallic acid in humans (1). Primary gallate-decarboxylating microbial phyla in the intestinal microbiota are Firmicutes (74.6%), Proteobacteria (17.6%), and Actinobacteria (7.8%) (3).

1. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2541-0

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK22268/

3. https://aem.asm.org/content/84/19/e01558-18.short, and http://www.researchgate.net/publication/326662214_A_Diverse_Range_of_Human_Gut_Bacteria_Have_the_Potential_To_Metabolize_the_Dietary_Component_Gallic_Acid

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