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“WHERE THINGS SO SMALL CAN HAVE A MASSIVE IMPACT ON YOUR HEALTH.”
Herbsprout is a webblog and podcast dedicated to sharing the health benefits of herbs, food, innovations related to our gut microbiome. Herbsprout seeks to bridge the vast chasm dividing the mainstream medical community, alternative medicine, and Asian medicine, especially of China (TCM), India (Ayurveda), and Japan (eJim & Kampo).

Some species of gut bacteria support, others resist weight loss

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In a September 16 2021 Science Focus report, Seattle’s Institute for Systems Biology lead author Dr Christian Diener is quoted saying “your gut microbiome can help or cause resistance to weight loss and this opens up the possibility to try to alter the gut microbiome to impact weight loss.”

Dr. Diener’s assertions are based on a study of 5,000 dieters with a focus of 105 individuals and a control group, collecting blood and stool samples from the participants, and studying their genetic material. The study found that specific gut bacteria in each group were resistant, while others supported weight loss. In the Science Focus article, Dr. Diener concludes that “the gut microbiome is a major player in modulating whether a weight loss intervention will have success or not.”

https://www.sciencefocus.com/news/gut-microbiome-weight-loss-study/amp/



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Study of common medicine on gut bacteria shows reduced efficacy

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Common medications can accumulate in gut bacteria, says a new study reported September 08 2021 in Medical Express. Research on the subject was conducted by Medical Research Council (MRC) Toxicology Unit at the University of Cambridge and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Germany. The building up of drugs in our gut bacteria can alter bacterial function and reduce the drug’s effectiveness.

15 common drugs were combined and tested with 25 different gut bacteria to see how they interacted. The researchers found that the drug accumulated in the gut bacteria demonstrated some signs of reduction in the availability of the drug to the rest of the human body. It is believed that the accumulation altered bacterial function, believed to be linked to side-effects. The research was first reported in Nature.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-09-common-medications-accumulate-gut-bacteria.amp

https://www.genengnews.com/news/microbiomes-metabolism-altered-by-bioaccumulation-of-medications/

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Global Microbiome Market reached nearly $5 billion in 2020

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source: Dreamtime.com source: Dreamtime.com
According to a July 12, 2021 Market and Research report, the global microbiome market reached a value of nearly $4,977.2 million in 2020, having increasing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12.6% since 2015. The market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 12.7% from 2020 to reach $9,061.0 million in 2025.

The human microbiome market is segmented by type into microbial drugs and fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) with microbial drugs accounting for 70% of the total. Asia-Pacific was the largest region in the global microbiome market, accounting for 37.2% share of the total in 2020, according to Market and Research.

The global microbiome market is expected to reach $15,554.8 million in 2030, at a CAGR of 11.4%.

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-microbiome-markets-report-2021-market-is-expected-to-reach-15-55-billion-in-2030--at-a-cagr-of-11-4-301326835.html

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Tryptophan essential to gut health

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According to an August 4 2021 Sci Tech Daily tryptophan is an essential amino acid for your microbiome gut health. Tryptophan is known to aid in the creation of the neurotransmitter serotonin and melatonin. Tryptophan is commonly found in milk, turkey, chicken, and oats. A deficiency of tryptophan led threefold increase in the bacterium Acetatifactor, and significant reductions of Mucispirillum and Blautia, concludes the author’s study.

This is first reported by Dr. Sadanand Fulzele, an aging researcher in the Medical College of Georgia Department of Medicine in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences.

https://scitechdaily.com/a-diet-lacking-in-tryptophan-alters-gut-microbiota-increases-inflammation/amp/

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Fungi may aid in building extraterrestrial habitats says astromycologist

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An August 03 2021 article in the Scientific American interviews what they call the first Astromycologist Paul Stamets along with other research teams who are studying how fungi can be leveraged to build extraterrestrial habitats and perhaps someday even terraform planets.

Stamets says plants need minerals, and “pairing fungi up with plants and debris from humans [causes them to] decompose into a form that then creates rich soils that could help generate the foods that astronauts need.” Stamets has identified oyster mushrooms as one of the best species of mushrooms that is able to breakdown regolith, or asteroid dust so far.

According to the Scientific American article, Stamets says that oyster mushrooms are particularly adept at breaking down hydrocarbons and dismantling them, then restructure them into fungal carbohydrates, or sugars. It is possible he says to feed the mushrooms certain nutritional supplements which create a catalytic reaction, which in turn creates more biodiversity.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/space-travels-most-surprising-future-ingredient-mushrooms/

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Developing countries show microbial differences

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This study steps outside the wealthy regions of Europe and North America to lower income countries such as Fiji and Guatemala with their gut microbiome research.

As reported in Medical Express’ July 28 2021 issue by Cornell’s David Nutt, Ilana Brito, Cornell assistant professor and the Mong Family Sesquicentennial Faculty Fellow in Biomedical Engineering in the College of Engineering, and her team took microbiome samples from the three global populations and put them in 30 germ-free mice to study immune responses to intestinal infections. Microbial differences among these populations proved to show the varying degrees of response. Researchers also found that “housing the mice together so that they shared microbiota helped mice with low resistance to infection become more resilient”, according to the Medical Express report. The less resilient mice benefited from the sharing of microbiota.

Brito and her team found that Guatemala microbiota proved most resistant, followed by the U.S., then Fiji, according to the Medical Express report where she is quoted, "The interesting thing was they are exhibiting these differences in resilience to infection in a very short time.” This points to a possible health remedy through sharing microbiota across regions of the world.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-07-geographic-differences-gut-microbiota-boost.html

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Baboon study shows heritable gut microbiome

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A July 08 2021report by Medical Express at the University of Notre Dame found that most bacteria in the gut microbiome of baboons are heritable after looking at more than 16,000 gut microbiome profiles collected over 14 years. from a long-studied population of baboons in Kenya's Amboseli National Park.

“This moves us away from the idea that genes play very little role in the microbiome to the idea that genes play a pervasive, if small, role," said Elizabeth Archie, professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, she is quoted in Medical Express.

The researchers used fecal samples from 585 wild Amboseli baboons, typically with more than 20 samples per animal, including microbiome variations in the baboons' diets between wet and dry seasons. The result of this study showed that gut microbiome is 97% heritable.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-07-genes-gut-bacteria.html

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more on benefits of plant-based and seafood diets

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Mainstream media is picking up on the connection between our gut microbiome and our health. Another new study further validates the diets people who eat plant-based foods and seafoods because it supports the gut bacteria that eases inflammation in our bodies, according to an April 21 2021 article in U.S. News and World Report.

Senior researcher Dr. Rinse Weersma, a gastroenterologist and professor at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands and his team found that people who ate more vegetables, fruit, fatty fish, nuts and fiber-rich grains generally had higher concentrations of bacteria that churn out short-chain fatty acids.

While the article says genes, age, health conditions, medication use (particularly antibiotics) and stress are all factors in the health of one’s gut microbiome, diet is the most important. The study was based on “1,400 Dutch adults who answered questions on their diet habits and gave stool samples for a gut-microbe analysis,” according to the U.S. News and World Report article.

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-04-19/are-you-eating-foods-that-harm-your-microbiome

Related Herbsprout blog articles:

https://en.bloguru.com/healthtech/401069/environment-such-as-diet-plays-key-role

https://en.bloguru.com/healthtech/393692/more-links-to-food-and-our-gut-health



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Cow’s gut microbiome can digest plastic

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Plastic is notoriously hard to break down, but a July 02 2021 study by researchers in Austria reported in Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News has shown that bacteria from a cow’s rume, one of the four areas of the stomach, can digest certain types of man-made polyester plastics. The scientists are headed by Dr. Doris Ribitsch and her team at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Vienna.

What this means is the microbial community in cows can potentially help address a serious and growing environment problem by breaking down plastics, according to the report. This includes the following three key man made plastics: PET, polybutylene adipate terephthalate (PBAT, often used in compostable plastic bags), and polyethylene furanoate (PEF, a biobased material). The researchers analyzed the DNA and activities of bacterial enzymes in the cow’s stomachs to make this determination.

https://www.genengnews.com/news/microbiome-bacteria-in-cows-microbiome-can-break-down-man-made-plastics/

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Lactobacillus can help Japanese elderly gut health

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The relationship between the intake frequencies of fermented milk products containing Lactocaseibacillus paracasei strain Shirota (LcS), according to the June 17 2021 report in Nature magazine, nature.com. The gut microbiome of 218 Japanese subjects aged 66–91 years, some who consumed fermented milk over a year compared to a control group who did not. When ingested, LcS reaches the intestine alive and helps to ensure a good balance of gut microbiota among select elderly populations, says the study.

A 20-year study of Japanese in Gunma Prefecture reported the reduced risks of developing hypertension and infrequent bowel movements among elderly individuals who habitually take fermented milk products containing LcS. However, little remains known about the impact of the regular consumption of the probiotics, including LcS products, on the stability of human gut microbiota.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-91917-6

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