日本一面積の広いショッピングセンター

日本一(にっぽんいち)面積(めんせき)(ひろ)いしょっぴんぐせんたーは埼玉県(さいたまけん)にあるいおんれいくたうんで、店舗数(てんぽすう)が710あり、駐車場(ちゅうしゃじょう)は10400台分(だいぶん)(おお)きさがあります。

nippon'ichi menseki no hiroi shoppingu senta- wa Saitamaken ni aru ionreikutaun de, tenposū ga 710 ari, chūshajō wa 10400 daibun no ōkisa ga arimasu.

The shopping center with the largest area in Japan is AEON Lake Town in Saitama Prefecture, with 710 stores and a parking lot large enough for 10,400 vehicles.




sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

Japanese Online Newsletter Vol. 149 集団で行動する日本人(しゅうだんでこうどうするにほんじん)

日本人(にほんじん)周囲(しゅうい)()にしながら生活(せいかつ)をしています。ですから、基本的(きほんてき)自分(じぶん)だけ(ほか)(ひと)(べつ)行動(こうどう)をすることを(この)みません。たとえ法律(ほうりつ)(はん)した行為(こうい)であったとしても他人(たにん)()行動(こうどう)するのです。(たと)えば、信号(しんごう)無視(むし)して道路(どうろ)(わた)るような場合(ばあい)でも、(おお)くの他人(たにん)(わた)っていれば問題(もんだい)はないと(かんが)えます。「(みんな)(わた)れば(こわ)くない」と()流行(りゅうこう)()が1980(ねん)(ごろ)(ひろ)まったように、日本人(にほんじん)(おお)くは集団(しゅうだん)行動(こうどう)するのです。

またコロナ()日本(にほん)では、政府(せいふ)屋外(おくがい)ではマスクをしなくて()いと()っても、ほぼ全員(ぜんいん)がマスクをして外出(がいしゅつ)しています。これは極端(きょくたん)(れい)ですが、日本(にほん)流行(はや)り、(すた)りが(はげ)しい(くに)です。いままでいくつも流行(りゅうこう)があったのですが、流行(りゅうこう)(ひろ)がるとみんなが(おな)じことをします。ファッション、髪型(かみがた)(いろ)、おもちゃ、(うた)、テレビ番組(ばんぐみ)など(いま)までにも(おお)くの流行(りゅうこう)がありました。そしてこれらの流行(りゅうこう)は、すごいスピードで(ひろ)がるのですが、ある(とき)突然(とつぜん)(だれ)見向(みむ)きもしなくなるのです。

海外(かいがい)からの旅行者(りょこうしゃ)はどうしても目立(めだ)ってしまいます。また、日本(にほん)でどのように行動(こうどう)をしたらいいかわからないときも(おお)いと(おも)います。そのようなときは、(まわ)りにいる(ひと)(たち)がどのようにしているのかを注意(ちゅうい)して観察(かんさつ)して、自分(じぶん)行動(こうどう)()めるようにしてみてください。日本(にほん)社会(しゃかい)では、目立(めだ)たないことが()()れられる一番(いちばん)近道(ちかみち)かもしれません。

Japanese people act in groups

Japanese people live their lives being aware of their surroundings. Essentially, they do not like to act independently of others. Even if it is against the law to do something, they will act in a similar manner as others. For example, people do not see a problem with jaywalking if they see other people crossing. The phrase "if everyone crosses together, there is nothing to be afraid of" became popular around 1980, and effectively describes how many Japanese people act in groups.

When the Covid pandemic struck Japan, almost everyone began wearing masks when going out, even though the government had told people that they do not need to wear them outdoors. This is an extreme example, but Japan is a country where trends come and go. When a trend begins, everyone follows suit. There have been many fads in fashion, hairstyles, colors, toys, songs, and TV shows. These trends spread quickly, and just as fast as they arrive, they abruptly go out of fashion.

This, of course, leads to travelers from abroad inevitably standing out. I also believe there are many occasions in which people do not know how to act in Japan. In these instances, try to carefully observe what people around you are doing and decide what you should do. In Japanese society, being inconspicuous may be the quickest way to be accepted.


sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

ふぐ食の歴史

Qwert1234, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons
現在(げんざい)では高級料理(こうきゅうりょうり)として、日本各地(にほんかくち)()べられているふぐですが、どのような歴史(れきし)があるのでしょうか。安土桃山時代(あずちももやまじだい)には、朝鮮(ちょうせん)出兵(しゅっぺい)(さい)(あつ)まった武士(ぶし)がふぐ中毒(ちゅうどく)死亡(しぼう)する事件(じけん)多発(たはつ)したため、1598(ねん)豊臣(とよとみ)秀吉(ひできち)によって「ふぐ(しょく)禁止令(きんしれい)」が発布(はっぷ)されました。それ以来(いらい)ふぐ(しょく)禁止(きんし)江戸時代(えどじだい)()ぎて明治時代(めいじじだい)まで(つづ)くことになり、1888(ねん)総理大臣(そうりだいじん)伊藤(いとう)博文(ひろふみ)(はたら)きかけにより(はじ)めて「ふぐ(しょく)禁止令(きんしれい)」が()かれたそうです。

Genzai de wa kōkyū ryōri toshite, Nippon kakuchi de taberareteiru fugu desu ga, dono yōna rekishi ga aru no deshō ka. Azuchi Momoyama jidai ni wa, Chōsen shuppei no saini atsumatta bushi ga fugu chūdoku de shibōsuru jiken ga tahatsushita tame, 1598 nen ni Toyotomi Hideyoshi niyotte “fugushoku kinshirei” ga happusaremashita. Sore irai fugushoku kinshi wa Edo jidai o sugite Meijiki made tsuzuku koto ni nari, 1888 nen ni sōri daijin Itō Hirobumi no hatarakikake niyori hajimete “fugushoku kinshirei” ga tokareta sō desu.

Today, fugu is a luxury food and is consumed throughout Japan, but what is its history? During the Azuchi-Momoyama period (1568-1600), many samurai who gathered for the invasion of Korea died from fugu poisoning, leading to the issuance of a ban on fugu consumption by Toyotomi Hideyoshi in 1598. Since then, the prohibition of eating fugu continued past the Edo period (1603-1868) into the Meiji period (1868-1912), until in 1888, at the urging of Prime Minister Ito Hirobumi, the prohibition of eating fugu was lifted for the first time.



sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

Japanese Online Newsletter Vol. 148 日本の祝日(にほんのしゅくじつ)

日本(にほん)祝日(しゅくじつ)(おお)いと()われています。実際(じっさい)どれだけの祝日(しゅくじつ)があるのでしょうか。2023(ねん)(れい)()てみましょう。


  1. 2023/1/1  (日)(にち)  元日(がんじつ)

  2. 2023/1/2  (月)(げつ)  振替休日(ふりかえきゅうじつ)

  3. 2023/1/9  (月)(げつ)  成人(せいじん)()

  4. 2023/2/11  (土)()  建国(けんこく)記念(きねん)()

  5. 2023/2/23  (木)(もく)  天皇(てんのう)誕生(たんじょう)()

  6. 2023/3/21  (火)()  春分(しゅんぶん)()

  7. 2023/4/29  (土)()  昭和(しょうわ)()

  8. 2023/5/3  (水)(すい)  憲法(けんぽう)記念(きねん)()

  9. 2023/5/4  (木)(もく)  みどりの()

  10. 2023/5/5  (金)(きん)  こどもの()

  11. 2023/7/17  (月)(げつ)  (うみ)()

  12. 2023/8/11  (金)(きん)  (やま)()

  13. 2023/9/18  (月)(げつ)  敬老(けいろう)()

  14. 2023/9/23  (土)()  秋分(しゅうぶん)()

  15. 2023/10/9  (月)(げつ)  スポーツの()

  16. 2023/11/3  (金)(きん)  文化(ぶんか)()

  17. 2023/11/23  (木)(もく)  勤労(きんろう)感謝(かんしゃ)(


2023(ねん)には17の祝日(しゅくじつ)があります。2023(ねん)元旦(がんたん)日曜日(にちようび)になるため、翌日(よくじつ)振替休日(ふりかえきゅうじつ)になっています。日本人(にほんじん)(おお)くは有給(ゆうきゅう)休暇(きゅうか)などを()らずに(はたら)かなければいけないという風潮(ふうちょう)があるので、()わりに固定(こてい)(やす)みを(つく)必要(ひつよう)があるため祝日(しゅくじつ)(おお)いそうです。しかしそうすると(おお)くの(ひと)(やす)みが集中(しゅうちゅう)するので、交通(こうつう)渋滞(じゅうたい)などが発生(はっせい)してしまいます。ぜひ(みな)さんの(くに)祝日(しゅくじつ)について(おし)えて(くだ)さい。

Holidays in Japan

Japan has many national holidays. Let’s look at the holidays in 2023 to see how many holidays Japan actually has.


  1. Jan. 1, 2023: New Year’s Day

  2. Jan. 2, 2023: Substitute Holiday

  3. Jan. 9, 2023: Coming of Age Day

  4. Feb. 11, 2023: National Foundation Day

  5. Feb. 23, 2023: The Emperor’s Birthday

  6. March 21, 2023: Vernal Equinox Day

  7. April 29, 2023: Showa Day

  8. May 3, 2023: Memorial Day

  9. May 4, 2023: Greenery Day

  10. May 5, 2023: Children’s Day

  11. July 17, 2023: Marine Day

  12. Aug. 11, 2023: Mountain Day

  13. Sept. 18, 2023: Respect for the Aged Day

  14. Sept. 23, 2023: Autumnal Equinox Day

  15. Oct. 9, 2023: Sports Day

  16. Nov. 3, 2023: Culture Day

  17. Nov. 23, 2023: Labor Thanksgiving Day


There will be 17 Japanese national holidays in 2023. In 2023, New Year’s Day falls on a Sunday, so the following day is what’s called a substitute holiday. In Japan, there’s a social trend where they have to work without using paid vacations. So, instead, they have holidays, which is why there are so many in Japan. However, since everyone celebrates the same holidays and takes off on the same days, problems like traffic jams occur. Please tell us about holidays in your country.


sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

日本一標高の高いホテル

日本一(にほんいち)標高(ひょうこう)(たか)いほてるは長野県(ながのけん)にあるほてる千畳敷(せんじょうじき)です。16部屋(へや)あり、食堂(しょくどう)、お風呂等(ふろなど)完備(かんび)しています。

nihon'ichi hyōkō no takai hoteru wa Naganoken ni aru hoteru Senjōjiki desu. 16 heya ari, shokudō, o furo nado o kanbishiteimasu.

The highest hotel in Japan is Hotel Senjojiki in Nagano Prefecture, with 16 rooms, a dining room, and a bath.



sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

Japanese Online Newsletter Vol. 147 マスクを外せない(マスクをはずせない)

日本(にほん)では、ほぼ全員(ぜんいん)がマスクをして外出(がいしゅつ)しています。社内(しゃない)でも全員(ぜんいん)がマスクをしています。レストランに(はい)るときもマスクをし、(しょく)()()わるとまたマスクを()けます。日本(にほん)航空(こうくう)会社(がいしゃ)国際(こくさい)(せん)でも機内(きない)乗客(じょうきゃく)にマスク着用(ちゃくよう)義務付(ぎむづ)けています。まるでマスクをしないことが(わる)(こと)かのように、またマスクをすることがマナーかのようにマスク着用(ちゃくよう)義務付(ぎむづ)けています。

日本(にほん)政府(せいふ)は、屋外(おくがい)でマスクを着用(ちゃくよう)する必要(ひつよう)はないと()っていますが、マスクをしない(ひと)はほとんどいません。医学的(いがくてき)にマスクをすることが()いことなのかは(わたし)にはわかりませんが、マスクをしないといけないと(かん)じる日本(にほん)社会(しゃかい)は、海外(かいがい)から()ると(へん)であることは()うまでもありません。

マスクだけではありません。レストランなど建物(たてもの)(はい)るときには入口(いりぐち)(かなら)検温(けんおん)システムがあって、それで検温(けんおん)をして平熱(へいねつ)でなければ(なか)(はい)れないのです。検温(けんおん)システムには2種類(しゅるい)あって、タブレットのようなデバイスに(かお)(うつ)()して検温(けんおん)をするシステムと、もう1つは消毒液(しょうどくえき)のディスペンサーで、そこに()をかざすと消毒液(しょうどくえき)()ると同時(どうじ)検温(けんおん)(おこな)われるというものです。

これだけのことをしても、日本(にほん)では毎日(まいにち)(おお)くの(ひと)がコロナに感染(かんせん)しています。最近(さいきん)では、症状(しょうじょう)悪化(あっか)しないケースが(おお)いのですが、ここまでやってもゼロにはならないようです。一体(いったい)、マスクにどれだけの効果(こうか)があるのでしょうか。もうコロナとは共存(きょうぞん)するしかないかと(おも)いますが、集団(しゅうだん)行動(こうどう)する日本人(にほんじん)がマスクを(はず)せる()はまだ(さき)なのでしょう。

The Mask Mandate in Japan

In Japan, almost everyone wears a mask when going out. Even at the office, everyone wears a mask. In restaurants, people wear them when coming in and then again after their meal. Japanese airlines require passengers to wear masks, even on airplanes for international flights. Because they require people to wear masks in Japan, it’s as if not wearing a mask is a bad thing, and wearing a mask displays good manners.

The Japanese government also says that wearing a mask outdoors isn’t necessary, but only a few people don’t wear them outside. I’m not sure if wearing a mask is good from a medical point of view. However, it goes without saying that the Japanese way of imposing a mask mandate is strange from a foreigner’s perspective.

It’s not just masks either. When entering a restaurant or other public place, they always check your temperature at the entrance. If your temperature isn’t normal, they won’t let you enter the facility. There are two types of temperature inspection systems: one uses a tablet-like device to scan your face and take your temperature. The other requires you to place your hand over a disinfectant dispenser that’ll take your temperature as it discharges the disinfectant.

Even with all this, Covid still affects people in Japan every day. In many recent cases, there have only been mild symptoms. But it seems that even after all this work, the number of cases hasn’t reached zero. So, how effective are masks? I don’t think we have a choice but to live with Covid, but because Japanese people act in groups, it may be a while before they feel comfortable taking off their masks in public.



sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

海中郵便ポスト

1999(ねん)4(がつ)南紀熊野体験博(なんきくまのたいけんはく)での イベント の(ひと)つとして、和歌山県(わかやまけん)すさみ(ちょう)枯木灘海岸(かれきなだかいがん)(きし)から 100m、水深(すいしん)10m の海底(かいてい)(むかし)ながらの丸型(まるがた)ポスト が設置(せっち)されました。実際(じっさい)投函(とうかん)された ハガキ は地元(じもと)の ダイバー が毎日(まいにち)回収(かいしゅう)し、日本(にっぽん)郵便(ゆうびん)株式会社(かぶしきがいしゃ)(つう)じて全国(ぜんこく)配達(はいたつ)していて、2011(ねん)10(がつ)1(にち)には投函数(とうかんすう)が 3(まん)(つう)記録(きろく)しました。2002(ねん)の ギネスブック に「世界一(せかいいち)(ふか)いところにある ポスト」として認定(にんてい)されました。

1999 nen 4 gatsu ni Nanki Kumano taikenhaku de no ibento no hitotsu toshite, Wakayamaken Susamichō no kareki nada kaigan, kishi kara 100 m, suishin 10 m no kaitei ni mukashinagara no marugata posuto ga setchisaremashita. jissai ni tōkansareta hagaki wa jimoto no daiba- ga mainichi kaishūshi, Nippon yūbin kabushikigaisha otsūjite zenkoku ni haitatsushiteite, 2011 nen 10 gatsu tsuitachi ni wa tōkansū ga 3 man tsū o kirokushimashita. 2002 nen no Ginesubukku ni “sekaiichi fukai tokoroni aru posuto” toshite ninteisaremashita.

In April 1999, as one of the events of the Experience Nanki-Kumano Exposition, an old-fashioned cylindrical postbox was installed on the the sea floor, 100 meters from the shore and 10 meters deep, on the Karekinada Beach in Susami Town, Wakayama Prefecture. In 2002, the postbox was recognized by the Guinness Book of Records as the “World’s deepest underwater postbox.”



sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

Japanese Online Newsletter Vol. 146 日本での生活のルール(にほんでのせいかつのルール)

日本(にほん)生活(せいかつ)をするには色々(いろいろ)なルールがあります。「ポイ()禁止(きんし)」「喫煙(きつえん)禁止(きんし)」「携帯(けいたい)はマーナーモード」など標識(ひょうしき)になっているものもありますが、どこにも()かれていない「常識(じょうしき)」や「マナー」と()われるルールも(おお)くあります。(なか)には、「茶道(さどう)」「華道(かどう)」「ビジネスマナー」のように、特定(とくてい)場面(ばめん)(おう)じたルールもあります。

実際(じっさい)には、ルールが(おお)すぎて、日本人(にほんじん)でも()らないものが(おお)くあります。(たと)えば、「エスカレーターでは左側(ひだりがわ)()って、右側(みぎがわ)(ある)(ひと)のために()けておく」(ただし関西(かんさい)(ぎゃく))や、「歩道(ほどう)右側(みぎがわ)(ある)く」などは(おお)くの場合(ばあい)(とく)看板(かんばん)はありません。「お風呂(ふろ)(はい)(とき)は、(さき)(からだ)(なが)してきれいにして(はい)る」「電車(でんしゃ)()りる(ひと)優先(ゆうせん)で、(ひと)()()わってから()(はじ)める」なども()かれていません。

では、()かれていない、しかも()らないルールをどのようにして(まも)ればよいのでしょうか。(じつ)は、それほど(むずか)しいことではありません。(まわ)りの(ひと)がどのようにしているのかを観察(かんさつ)して、(おな)じことをすれば()いのです。そう、日本人(にほんじん)はグループでも()()いでもないのに団体(だんたい)行動(こうどう)します。それは、(おお)くの(ひと)がやっていればそれが(ただ)しいと(かんが)える習慣(しゅうかん)があるからです。ですから、日本人(にほんじん)個性(こせい)がないとよく()われてしまいます。

反対(はんたい)(おお)くの(ひと)間違(まちが)った行動(こうどう)をすると、たとえそれが間違(まちが)っていたとしても(ただ)しい、となってしまいます。これが日本(にほん)(こわ)いところでもあるのです。「みんなでやれば(こわ)くない」という言葉(ことば)があるように、集団(しゅうだん)での行動力(こうどうりょく)日本人(にほんじん)はすごいと(おも)います。(たと)えば流行(りゅうこう)もそうです。日本(にほん)では流行(りゅうこう)がすごく(ひろ)がりやすいですが同時(どうじ)(すた)るのも(はや)いです。

日本(にほん)生活(せいかつ)する(さい)は、(まわ)りが(なに)をしているのかを()て、それを真似(まね)すればルール違反(いはん)にはなりません。日本(にほん)()ったらみんなが(なに)をしているのか、()てみてください。また、(あたら)しいルールを()つけたら是非(ぜひ)(おし)えてください。

Rules When Living in Japan

There are many rules when living in Japan. Some are written on signs like, "No littering", "No smoking", or "Cell phones should be in silent mode". But there are also unwritten rules that are referred to as "common sense" or "manners". Some rules are specific to particular occasions, like “Japanese tea ceremonies”, “flower arrangements”, and “business manners".

In fact, there are so many rules, many of which Japanese people don’t even know. For example, standing on the left side on escalators to leave the right side open for walkers (or the opposite in Kansai) and walking on the right side of sidewalks aren’t specifically written rules on signs in many cases. Other examples of unwritten rules include washing and cleaning your body first before taking a bath and giving priority to those getting off a train.

So, how can we follow these unwritten and unknown rules? It’s actually not as difficult as it sounds. All you have to do is observe what others are doing around you and do the same. Japanese people act in groups, even if they don’t know each other or are not in the group. They have a habit of thinking something is right if many other people are doing it. Therefore, people often say the Japanese lack individuality.

Conversely, something wrong can become right when many people do it. This is one of the scariest things about Japan. They have a saying that goes, “if everyone does it together, there is nothing to be afraid of”. So, I think Japanese people have a great ability to act collectively. So, it’s easy to spread trends in Japan. Likewise, trends can also go very quickly.

While living in Japan, you won’t violate any rules if you imitate what others are doing. When you go to Japan, please look at what everyone else is doing. Also, if you find any new rules, please let us know.



sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

日本の最年少内閣総理大臣

日本(にっぽん)最年少(さいねんしょう)内閣(ないかく)総理(そうり)大臣(だいじん)伊藤(いとう)博文(ひろぶみ)の44(さい)3か(げつ)です。

Nippon no sainenshō naikaku sōri daijin wa Itō Hirobumi no 44 sai 3 kagetsu desu.

Japan's youngest Prime Minister was Hirobumi Ito at 44 years and 3 months.




sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

Japanese Online Newsletter Vol. 145 新幹線の社内アナウンスメント(しんかんせんのしゃないアナウンスメント)

(わたし)日本(にほん)()(とき)は、東京(とうきょう)(えき)新大阪(しんおおさか)(えき)新幹線(しんかんせん)移動(いどう)します。その(とき)()車内(しゃない)アナウンスは()()れていますが、(はじ)めて()られる(かた)のためにその内容(ないよう)をご紹介(しょうかい)させていただきます。

新大阪(しんおおさか)(えき)から東京(とうきょう)()かうのぞみ(ごう)新大阪(しんおおさか)()(あと)のアナウンスメントです。

今日(きょう)も、新幹線(しんかんせん)をご利用(りよう)くださいまして、ありがとうございます。
この電車(でんしゃ)はのぞみ(ごう)東京(とうきょう)()きです。
途中(とちゅう)停車(ていしゃ)(えき)は、京都(きょうと)名古屋(なごや)新横浜(しんよこはま)品川(しながわ)です。
この電車(でんしゃ)全席(ぜんせき)禁煙(きんえん)となっております。
煙草(たばこ)()われるお客様(きゃくさま)は、喫煙(きつえん)ルームをご利用(りよう)ください。
普通車(ふつうしゃ)喫煙(きつえん)ルームは3(ごう)(しゃ)・7(ごう)(しゃ)・15(ごう)(しゃ)
グリーン(ぐりーん)(しゃ)喫煙(きつえん)ルームは10(ごう)(しゃ)にあります。
(えき)(およ)車内(しゃない)への危険物(きけんぶつ)()()みは禁止(きんし)されております。
不審(ふしん)なものや行為(こうい)にお()づきの場合(ばあい)は、乗務(じょうむ)(いん)または(えき)係員(かかりいん)までお()らせください。

京都(きょうと)(えき)到着(とうちゃく)する(まえ)(なが)れるアナウンスです。

まもなく、京都(きょうと)です。
東海道線(とうかいどうせん)山陰線(さんいんせん)()西(せい)(せん)奈良(なら)(せん)近鉄(きんてつ)(せん)地下鉄線(ちかてつせん)はお()()えです。
今日(きょう)新幹線(しんかんせん)をご利用(りよう)くださいましてありがとうございました。
京都(きょうと)()ますと、(つぎ)名古屋(なごや)()まります。

YouTube実際(じっさい)のアナウンスを()くことができます。ご興味(きょうみ)のある(かた)はご視聴(しちょう)(くだ)さい。

The Shinkansen, or Bullet Train, Announcement

When I visit Japan, I take the Shinkansen between Tokyo Station and Shin-Osaka Station. I’m used to hearing the train announcements, but for those of you who have never taken a Shinkansen, here’s what they say on them.

As an example, this is the announcement you’ll hear after leaving Shin-Osaka Station on the Nozomi train bound for Tokyo:

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the Shinkansen.
This is the Nozomi Super Express bound for Tokyo.
We’ll be stopping at Kyoto, Nagoya, Shin-Yokohama, and Shinagawa stations before arriving at Tokyo terminal.
Smoking is not allowed on this train except in the designated smoking rooms
located in cars 3, 7, and 15.
The smoking room in car number 10 is for passengers in the Green Cars.
Please refrain from smoking in the train, including the areas at either end of the cars.
The conductor’s room is in car number 8.
Hazardous items are prohibited on stations and trains.
If you notice any suspicious items or behavior, please notify staff immediately.
Thank you.

And this is the announcement played before arriving at Kyoto Station:

Ladies and gentlemen, we will soon make a brief stop at Kyoto.
Passengers going to the Tokaido, Sanin, Kosei, Nara, Kintetsu and subway lines, please change trains here at Kyoto.
Thank you.

If you’d like to listen to the actual announcements, you can find the video on YouTube.



sign up for the Japanese-Online Newsletter

__..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._ あいうえお かきくけこ さしすせそ たちつてと なにぬねの はひふへほ まみむめも やいゆえよ らりるれろ わゐうゑを ん __..-・**・-..__..-・**・-.._


#JapaneseOnline #LearningJapanese #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseVideoLearning #JapaneseAnime #Anime #JapaneseFood #Bloguru

#Bloguru #FreeJapaneseLessons #JapaneseOnline #JapaneseVideoLearning #LearningJapanese #日本語 #日本語学び

People Who Wowed This Post

×
  • If you are a bloguru member, please login.
    Login
  • If you are not a bloguru member, you may request a free account here:
    Request Account